Agent Orange - Korea

Discussion in 'Agent Orange' started by vet12, Jul 4, 2004.

  1. vet12

    vet12 New Member

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    I was denied a claim for AO/non hopkins lymphoma connection. I was in Korea 1968-1969. However I was not stationed on the DMZ. I was stationed in Ascom. I got an email from a vet stating AO was stored in Ascom and had damaged containers. If anyone can confirm this it would be greatly appreciated. We were located in the same watershed as where AO was sprayed per another vet.Our clothes were washed in this water. If anyone can confirm or have any info of help, I would appreciate it. We were close to Inchon.
  2. bluejay02130

    bluejay02130 New Member

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    agent orange korea

    If any one has any information or questions please contact me directly Bill Kenney [email protected] served Korea 1967-8 looking for information from all years. I do have contacts for assestance.
  3. Yoge Mountain

    Yoge Mountain New Member

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    Agent Orange- Korea

    Korea's Cold War (yeah right) Vets are about as forgotten as the Korean War.

    Most all tributaries in Central Korea are fed by the Haan River which runs from the DMZ. Certainly, any AO spraying done inside the DMZ in April 1969 as ROK Army soldiers now have claimed to their Govt., (which is the only reason the US now acknowledges spraying was done in South Korea), would get into the water supply down South. Our small camp's drinking water supply was from a nearby shallow creek and was chlorinated in camp. As were our clothes washed in that creek.

    Unlike Vietnam, Korea has a Spring snow melt. Any AO chemicals sprayed along the DMZ in 1968-1969 would flow South in 1969-1970. US DOD, and therefore the VA only recognizes that (some) 2nd infantry serving along Korea's DMZ during the period 1968-1969 could have been exposed. (duh!)

    Anyway, my camp's Battery Clerk, Steve, is now a lawyer and a VVnW/ Veterans Coalition member. He has provided testimony to my VA claim that a defoliant was in fact sprayed at my AAA camp- which was South of Seoul- to keep our free fire lanes open. The VA and DOD should now have to follow up on that, as his statement along with my own is credible evidence. Let's see what they come up with- if anything.

    Meanwhile, Im looking for a Neurologist, other than at the VA Hospital at E. Orange, NJ that can understand English.

    Only the City of Seoul may have monitoired the drinking water quality back then. That City may have maintained records from the time period, but did they test for Dioxin or Arsenic? This is something worth loooking into if anyone has the resources.

    Any Army or AF Officers, NCO's or EM's with direct knowledge of Orange or White striped drums being handled and used in Korea, and chemicals sprayed as a herbicide/ defoliant, should speak up and come to the aid of their fellow Vets. Agent Orange spraying didn't happen without the Commander's or Ist Sgt.'s knowledge.

    Why did US 2nd Infantry guys and all of US Armed Forces serving in Cold war Korea during the "commie build up" have to learn in 1999 when some 30,000 ROK Army soldiers put in claims for health problems from AO that they too could have been exposed.???? Is the US worried about more lawsuits against Dow Chemical?
  4. Yoge Mountain

    Yoge Mountain New Member

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    ASCOM Vet

    Vet12

    Try: http://cybersarges.tripod.com/aoinkorea.html

    This site link mentions a Cold War Korea Vet who served at Camp Casey, who has a condition that sounds similar to yours. The web site states his condition was accepted by the VA as possibly AO related and he got treatment -whatever that means. Camp Casey is 11 miles South of the DMZ, in a mountain valley watershed of the Haan River. Maybe you can get some more info. on that Vet's case and try an appeal at the VA.
  5. The AO Man

    The AO Man New Member

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    Agent Orange Information Sources

    :mad:
    They're not too worried about Dow and Monsanto getting sued any more. Congress sent a bill to the President, which he is expected to sign today, that severely limits lawsuits against companies like Dow and Monsanto that produce toxic substances.

    The Camp Casey case is a good example of a soldier who prevailed with the VA even though the government had not admitted spraying AT ALL when he won his case in 1999 with the Board of Veterans Appeals (BVA). His case can be found at: http://www.va.gov/vetapp99/files1/9906724.txt[/URL]

    The VA currently recognizes 16 units (12 in the 2nd I.D. and 6 in the 7th I.D. - two of which could have been in either division, thus the "bad math") as "potentially exposed" to Agent Orange and thus likely to be eligible for service-connected disability compensation and medical treatment. That list is attached. They refuse to recognize or admit that spraying occured anywhere other than "along the DMZ" and other than from April 1968 to July 1969.

    Please stay tuned to this site. Within the next week or two, a request will be posted asking that all vets who served in Korea from the day after the armistice in 1953 to the present time visit a new Web site and complete a survey regarding where they were, what they saw and did, and what diseases/disabilities they may now have as a result of possible exposure to Agent Orange and/or other toxic or hazardous materials. This information will then be available to veterans filing claims and appeals. It will also be provided to Congress to enact legislation to recognize the much broader time periods and locations where soldiers where exposed.

    There is a specific listing of diseases/conditions officially recognized at potentially caused by exposure to Agent Orange. That list is also attached for your reference. While other diseases/conditions may also be caused by exposure to AO, this is the "official list" as it now stands.

    Meanwhile, DO NOT ACCEPT "no" for an answer regarding disability possibly related to exposure to AO or other hazardous materials for the time you served in Korea. Veterans HAVE PREVAILED who served before and after the time limits the VA has established, and in units and locations other than those listed by the VA.

    Stay tuned - only a couple more weeks!

    Attached Files:

  6. fred pence

    fred pence New Member

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    Curious about what other places in Korea in 1969 and 1970, that agent orange may have been used, or have affected from water flow or snow melt. I have had some symptoms of some of the disease they have listed since I left there in 1970.
  7. JimmyC

    JimmyC New Member

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    I'm a Vietnam AO vet, but do know of one person who was approved as a result of Korea. His name is Tom Courbat, e-mail: [email protected]
  8. Cecil Sanders

    Cecil Sanders New Member

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    I was in Korea the summer of 69 where all supplies came into Korea, in 98 tranportation at Inchon . In 68 I was in Viet Nam with 4th inf. I have had all kinds of problems latest bladder cancer which doesn't count. Cecil Sanders [email protected] com
  9. natstarter

    natstarter New Member

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    Hi all,

    I was stationed in Korea from Oct 1968 to April 1970. Where I was stationed was Camp Humphries. I wqas assigned to the USASA Opertions Company there. In the Sprint of 1969 I was detailed to be an escort/guard for 3 Katusa personnel that were spraying a chemical inside the compound to keep the weeds down. They were using backpack sprayers and they were filling the sprayers from 55 gallon drums on the truck they came on. I don;t remember much about the 55 gallon drums other than they had a colored stripe around them. I don't remember the color though.

    I have been in contact with another person from the same unit that also stated that he sprayed herbicide inside the compound.

    If there are any other people out there that was at Camp Humphries and can remember or knows anything about the spraying of herbicide there please contact me.

    My e-mail is [email protected]

    Thanks
  10. John Stewart

    John Stewart New Member

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    Legislative Appeal

    I served in the Army from October 1966 through October 1970. I was stationed in South Korea with the 502 MI Battalion from March 1968 through June 1969. During that period is when the U.S. Government conducted extensive spraying of Agent Orange along the DMZ and other strategic areas. As a result of exposure to Agent Orange, many veterans, like myself have developed cancer, diabetes, kidney failure and other related diseases.

    Congress has granted to all Viet Nam veterans a ‘presumption of exposure’ for all diseases covered in the Agent Orange Registry. This ‘presumption of exposure’ is granted to them even if they served on a ship and never set foot on land. However, this same ‘presumption of exposure’ is not being extended to all 1968 and 1969 Korean veterans. Only select units of the 2nd and 7th Infantry Divisions stationed along the DMZ are granted ‘presumption of exposure’. All other Korean veterans are required to prove when, where and how they were exposed to Agent Orange and other toxic chemicals. This policy does not take into account the heavy snow fall and spring run off that occurs in Korea. Any chemicals sprayed along the DMZ would run off into the Imjin River and would be carried by its tributaries throughout the country contaminating ground water and drinking water as far south as Pusan. Anyone stationed in Korea during 1968 and 1969 had the potential of being exposed to Agent Orange.

    Because of my frustration with the process, I've taken to writing to Congress. I've written to all the Congressmen from New Jersey, the Chairman of the Veterans Affairs Committee, and the Ranking Republican on that committee.

    I've also met with Congressman Chris Smith who is a strong supporter of Veterans. In all cases I've expressed my frustration with the process and asked for legislation granting "assumption of exposure" to all 1968 and 1969 Korean veterans the same as granted to Viet Nam veterans.

    I think the only way we are going to be able to break the bureaucratic log jam is for all 1968 and 1969 Korean veterans to write to their congressmen requesting legislation granting "assumption of exposure" rights to 1968 and 1969 Korean veterans the same as is granted to Viet Nam veterans

    Please join me in this letter writing campaign.
  11. RandomRamblings

    RandomRamblings New Member

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    Help! Info needed on Camp Casey, Happy Valley, Happy Dragon area

    Hello,
    I hope someone can help us.

    My dad served in Korea on the DMZ at Camp Casey. He says it was also sometimes called Happy Valley and Happy Dragon. He served 1964-1967 in the US Army. He served 13 months at Camp Casey in 1964, 1965, maybe a small part of 1966.

    He remembers being told, this is weed killer, spray it. It being in large barrels with an orange and white stripe. He would pump it into a backpack and spray it, and sometimes spray it from a truck. There were no aerial spraying. He said it killed everything and when the rainy season came, there was no vegetation to hold back the water. He worked with the ROK and the KOTUSA.

    He has many symptoms of AO, but the VA is denying he used AO. That they didn't use it until 1968, but I have found recently declassified papers that it was being tested as far back at 1963. He has also been told that his military records were destroyed in the St Louis MO fire in 1973, but the governments own website states it was records of people that were discharged years before him. He is getting the run around and I am angry about it. If he is there are many, many more.

    AO symptoms are showing up in his offspring, my sister and I, and in our children. These men served their time for their country. Now he is being asked...why did you wait so long? He didn't. He started having skin issues right upon discharge. Even went through a panel of doctors, 21 sets came in to see him, so more than 21 doctors, and not one could agree what was wrong with him.

    Can anyone from that time frame, or prior, that has any memory, or knowledge, of Agent Orange, or any other toxic weedkillers please get with us? Anything can help. He has worked his whole life, and just wants to VA to recognize that he has health problems from his Army service. My name is Michelle Varney, I am his oldest daughter. I can be contacted via email at [email protected] My sister is Evelyn Shaw. Her email is [email protected] My father is Verlin Varney. His email is [email protected]

    We will be happy to share with you in return any information we find to help you as well.


    We thank you in advance.

    Verlin Varney
    Michelle Varney
    Evelyn Shaw
  12. sampau

    sampau New Member

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    I was stationed in Camp Casey, Korea, 7th Med Bn., 7th Inf Division, Co. A and D. since Jan to October 1970. I handled and sprayed AO around the barracks to defoliate. So, I was exposed and my claim has been denied, because they claim that AO was sprayed till Jun 1969. I have a rare progressive disease, diagnosed since 1998, Syringomyelia, a cyst in my spinal cord, been operated 3 times to decompress the cord; and last year was diagnosed with prostate cancer and underwent a radical prostatectomy. A buddy wrote a letter for my claim, but it was denied. Now I am trying to get my daily or morning reports and they dont appear in NARA, neither in NPRC. Need some help, somebody who was stationed there in this year and can write a letter certifying
  13. johniesee

    johniesee New Member

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    I was stationed at Co A 728 MP Bn. ASCOM 3/69 – 12-69, 13 S&S Bn. Yongsam 1/70- 4/70. I was detached from ASCOM to Korea Regional Exchange Depot Inchon to do armed escorts for PX trucks across ROK 5/69 – 12/69. I escorted the trucks to almost all locations of PX outlets including camps that were North of Freedom Bridge, i.e. Joint Security Area. I now have diabetes Type 2 and many associated conditions. My claim for service connection and compensation was denied due to location – base camp (ASCOM) was 17 miles south of DMZ My case is on appeal – in the DRO review stage since last year with no word yet. I have found an attorney that was interested in ASCOM vets obtaining benefits, he already represents some. I’d like to hear who you are doing.
    John Clark ([email protected])
  14. johniesee

    johniesee New Member

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    AO in ASCOM --- Denied benefits

    I was in ASCOM 3/69 - 12/70 ang Yongsam 1/70-4/70 VA denied claim. Agreed I have presumptive diseases and medical conditions and timeframe was right but denied due to location of base camp ASCOM. claim in DRO review. Hired Attorney John Dowd of Newburgh, NY who represents other ASCOM vets.
  15. jwensch

    jwensch New Member

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    i have been fighting benefits for 7 years and keep turning me down, i was stationed ascom in 1968, with b company 44th engineers, if anyone can help let me know.
  16. Bernard

    Bernard New Member

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    I was stationed with D/7/2 Hawk from 1970-1971. My doctors have all said my cardiac, diabetes, arthritis, etc was Agent Orange related. We have submitted buddy letters and photos/documents located on Hawk Missile site webpages to the VA. My service officer believes we can force the exposure issue during the current appeal process. He also said to get all the buddy letters you can, the VA is required to consider them also. My Congressman has told me the same thing. D/7/2 was on TAC site 34 during the time I was there. I will be glad to respond to any correspondence concerning Agent Orange use in Korea during this time and all information received from others will also be shared.
  17. William Lennartz

    William Lennartz New Member

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    I was at Camp Casey 4/68 to 2/69 and was attached to the 7th Inf Div MSA #31.
    This unit and the area that it guarded was by definition the most secured area within Camp Casey. It was surrounded by a cleared area outside of its main fence(s) line.
    No veg. in this area, none. I can not remember ever seeing anyone cutting, triming or mowing in this cleared area. (not much inside the area either) If AO was used around quarters and mess halls, then it was used at the MSA (Max Security Area). The MSA was located at the far end of Casey (away from the vill), Towards train fire and Happy Valley. I am looking for information to fuel my appeal with the VA and would appreciate any and all information that you have gathered. Hope to hear from you

    Bill

    PS the MAS had seasonal creek thur it and around it and in the spring and during the monsoon it went right on down tho the main part of Casey. If you were at Casey then
    that might be how you were exposed .

    [email protected]
  18. William C Boucher

    William C Boucher New Member

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  19. William C Boucher

    William C Boucher New Member

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    Google the Steve Witter Letters, he was with the chemical company and did a massive amount of spraying of herbicides in Korea. He mentions various camps and areas he personal spray. Letter are notorized.
  20. Joseph Allen Palmer

    Joseph Allen Palmer New Member

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