Crdp

Discussion in 'Disability' started by Jack, Jan 30, 2005.

  1. Jack

    Jack New Member

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    Grettings fellow vets, my name is Jack and today is the first time I've used this site, so I have no idea who, if anybody, will get this message, or where I would find a reply. I have been on innumerable websites trying to figure out Concurrent Receipt and retired pay. Just yesterday I was notified that I have been upgraded (or downgraded, depending on your point of view) to 100% Service Connected Disabled. The websited I have looked at have not been able to answer what I thought was a simple question. I am a 30 retired E9, I am 100% disabled with one dependent can anyone tell me what I can expect my monthly paycheck to look like?

    Thanks,
    Jack
  2. stumpy

    stumpy New Member

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    Well Jack you will draw the 100% rate as determined by the VA. You will draw the same amount from CRDP. Then you take the VA amount and subtract it from your earned retired pay and that is what you get from your branch of service.

    Example: you are drawing $3500 retired pay. Then you get rated 100% by the VA. Let's say the VA rate is $2300 a month.

    You would the get $2300 from the VA, and another $2300 from CRDP, subtract $2300 from your $3500 retired pay which is $1200 you would be due:

    $2300 from VA
    $2300 from CRDP
    $1200 earned retirement
    -------------
    $5800 gross amount due each month

    You need to go to this site to find out your VA rate according to you personal circumstances: http://www.vba.va.gov/bln/21/Rates/index.htm#BM01
  3. Jack

    Jack New Member

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    Stumpy,

    TANGO! That is the first time I've gotten a plain English answer to my question! I guess my next step is to check into CRSD.

    Jack
  4. stumpy

    stumpy New Member

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    Jack, if your 100% disabilities meet the criteria for CRSC I sure would apply. CRDP is taxable and CRSC is not.
  5. Jack

    Jack New Member

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    Stumpy,

    WILCO Brother. I had a disconnect with DFAS and VA and got a message back from the VA guy that completely contradicted what you told me about what I could expect as a gross monthly income. The VA guy said "CRDP cannot exceed gross retired pay (Mine is 3,261). A retired veteran rated 100% disabled by VA can receive a maximum of $750 CRDP." James Fowler, Veteran Service Center Manager. What's up with that?
  6. stumpy

    stumpy New Member

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    Jack are you rated as 100% scheduler or are you recieving payment at the 100% rate because of individual unemployability (IU). If you are 100% scheduler you should get what I told you. If you are IU you would get 750 plus the additional 10% for this year. Your original post stated that you were 100% so I assumed you were 100% scheduler.

    There is a big controversey going on right now because the IU Veterans want to recieve the same benefits that the 100% scheduler folks are getting. Here is a recent story about the problem.

    February 14, 2005 Air Force Times

    Congress may decide pay rate for 15,000 disabled retirees

    By Rick Maze
    Times staff writer

    It appears increasingly likely the Pentagon will defer to Congress about whether unemployable retirees with non-combat disabilities rated at less than 100 percent can receive full military retirement and veterans’ disability checks if they are eligible for both.

    If so, it would take months — possibly until late this year — for a decision to be reached about whether 15,000 disabled retirees whose non-combat disabilities are severe enough to prevent them from working should receive their full military retirement without the partial offset for the veterans’ disability benefits they receive.

    Military retirees who have formal 100 percent disability ratings from the Department of Veterans Affairs are allowed to receive their full retirement and disability payments. Those with disabilities from combat or combat-related training were made eligible for both payments two years ago, while those with disabilities from non-combat injuries or disease became fully eligible for both benefits Jan. 1.

    However, another group of retirees is left hanging: those with formal disability ratings of less than 100 percent — some as low as 60 percent — who are considered fully disabled because their conditions make them unemployable. They are known as “individual unemployability,” or IU, retirees.

    Since October, when Congress approved the most recent change in the so-called concurrent receipt rules, the Pentagon has tried to decide whether disabled retirees with non-combat, but service-connected, disabilities that keep them from working should get their full retirement pay, the same as other 100 percent disabled retirees. In December, defense officials told the White House’s Office of Management and Budget that the Pentagon “intended” to pay the unemployable veterans unless the White House had objections.

    Early optimism fades

    The language of the letter led the 15,000 fully disabled and unemployable retirees to expect the money in their end-of-January checks. However, the order to begin their payments never went out.

    In December and early January, officials working on the issue were optimistic that the unemployable retirees would receive the payments. Now, as a final decision has lagged, officials are less sure.

    “I think there is as much of a chance of the IU retirees being paid as not being paid,” said one defense official.

    If a decision is made to cover the IU retirees, they would be entitled to payments effective Jan. 1, regardless of when the decision comes down.

    Meanwhile, there’s no timetable for making that decision.

    Mark Olanoff of The Retired Enlisted Association said IU retirees expect the Pentagon to keep its word, based on the December memo.

    “In the memo, they said they intended to pay it. ... [N]ow they are saying it doesn’t mean what it says? That is wrong,” said Olanoff, executive director of TREA’s Washington office.

    Mike Jordan of the Military Officers Association of America was a little more upbeat.

    “My honest belief is that once the DoD general counsel finishes looking at this, they will err on the side of angels and pay the retirees,” Jordan said. “It’s just a shame we have to screw around with those who are 100 percent disabled. If we’re going to end up paying them in the end, we ought to just go ahead and do it.”
  7. Jack

    Jack New Member

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    Disability

    Stumpy,

    I don't know what I am. I don't know what a scheduler is, but I have two jobs and about 250% worth of things wrong with me. Noone has told me I'm unemployable. I was at 90% and the VA sent me a letter(s) saying that the rating on my shoulders was "deferred" and they sent me an appointment to see a head-space and timing guy for PTSD. In the meantime I sent VA a letter asking them to reopen my case. I got a letter back from them saying the PTSD went up from 30 to 50 and the shoulder went from 20 to 30. I thought I was done. Yesterday I received another letter from VA telling me they are working on my claim for PTSD, lumbar spine disability, cervical spine disability and I need to furnish them additional evidence. I've already done the PTSD thing, and what I told them in the letter is that the VAMC is 50 miles away and I can make it about half way, then I have to stop, because of the dang pain in my neck and my lower back. So their answer is to make me come back up there so they can examine me again. I know I am going to have to live with the PTSD, I just want to quit hurting. The letter says if I fail to provide them the requested information they may deny my claim or I may get less money. How do you show pain on an X-Ray, CT, or MRI, I just hurt. Is it possible, since I'm already maxed out, to call or write this guy and tell them just to leave me alone?

    Thanks, Bro
    Jack
    RLTW
  8. stumpy

    stumpy New Member

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    Jack it is very hard for me to follow what your saying. In your first post you said you were rated at 100%. Then in your last post you said that you were 90% and had some disabilities increased. You should of received a rating decision letter from the VA stating exactly what your rating is. What does it say? Does it say you are 100% or does it say you are rated 90% and they will pay you 100% because of Individual unemployabiliy (IU)? I really can't answer your questions until you find out how you are rated by the VA.

    P.S. How much is the VA paying you each month and how many familiy members do you have? Also how much money are you getting from CRDP?
  9. Jack

    Jack New Member

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    Stumpy,
    Sorry if I confused you. I was at 90% drawing $539 CRDP. VA had me come up at their request, reevaluated me and then sent me their decision letter saying I was now 100%, doesn't say anything about IU, it says that their decision as of 27 Jan is that I am now 100% SC disabled with one dependent. DFAS paid me the $539 because they were still carrying me at 90%. Does that make any more sense? My wife says I talk like I write, it's amazing anybody can understand what I'm saying.
    Jack
    RLTW
  10. stumpy

    stumpy New Member

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    Ok Jack, I see know, this action just accured. Since you are now rated at 100% my first reply to you is correct. As a retired E-9 I assume that your retired pay is more then the 100% rate the VA will pay you. You will get the full VA rate and DFAS will match that amount with CRDP funds. In reality you will be getting all of your EARNED retirement money plus your entire EARNED VA compensation. I hope this makes sense. If not I will provide you my phone number in a private post and we can discuss this on the telephone.
  11. Jack

    Jack New Member

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    Stumpy,

    OK, thanks. I guess I'll just wait and see if DFAS and VA can get on the same sheet of music. My other question, they sent me a letter, after they sent me the 100% decision paper, to send them more information on my C and L spine, I wrote VA and told them it just killed me physically to drive up there. There reponse was to schedule more tests, up there. I'm already at 100%, even if it is worse and it's going to be, as the arthritis progresses, what else are they going to do? Is there a way I can tell them to call off the dogs, or should I let them go hoping that it increases the chances of CRSC?

    Jack
    RLTW
  12. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    Jack:

    No one ever has to submit to any medical proceedure, ever. You don't have to get them to "call off the dogs". Just don't go. You don't have to. The consequence of this decision is the rater will base his decision on what ever claim is outstanding without the benefit of a C&P. Most likely, that claim will be denied but it won't affect any existing claim unless this exam is a followup/reexamination to evaluate temporary status.

    Now, if you really can't tolerate driving to the VAMC, why not have a relative or friend drive you. The DAV usually operates shuttle service using volunteer drivers in most area's. Someone else doing the driving just might provide you with enough ability to move around and relieve the stress of sitting still the whole trip. Just a thought.
  13. stumpy

    stumpy New Member

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    Jack I agree with TinCanMan that you should find some one to take you for the C&P exams. If you decide not to go, I would contact the VA and cancel the appointment. This will allow another Vet to use your appointment time.

    As far as CRSC goes, I recommend you study the Army CRSC site for the eligability requirements. Then you need to see if each disability that the VA approved fits the CRSC criteria. You also must look at your medical records as they must show that your medical problems are combat related. When you add up you combat disabilites remember CRSC uses VA math (combined ratings table). If you have more questions just ask.
  14. Jack

    Jack New Member

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    disability

    Stumpy,

    Is VA math different than what I learned in school? Thanks to you an YinCan Man on getting a ride up there, except it doesn't make much difference, It still hurts. I drive myself to give me something else to take my mind off of it. The drive is also worth a flash back or two, any time I smell sometging burning or smouldering I start thinking of villes and that god awful Nuoc Mom.

    Jack
    RLTW
  15. stumpy

    stumpy New Member

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    Jack, VA math is much different then what we learned in school. I will use my ratings as an example. I have disabilites rated at 40, 20, and 8 each at 10%. Using school math this equals 140%. However using VA math they come up with 80%. If you don't have one each disability rated at 100% you need many, many disablities to combine to hit that 100% mark. Actually you only need to get 95% as the VA will round that figure up to 100%.
  16. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    Jack:


    Math is math, including VA math. What folks are talking about, though is that disabilities are not added together in order to arrive at a sum. They are combined, not added. I get real confused when bi-lateral's are factored in but essentially it works like this:

    If you have two 50% disabilities, you don't add them together to arrive at 100%. If you are 50% disabled, then you are 50% able bodied. If you then are awarded another 50% disability you combine the two by taking the first 50% and then taking the new disability and multiplying it times the remaining able body portion. In this case; 50% of 50% = 25%. Now you add the 25% to the original 50%. That gives you 75%. you then average to the nearest 10% breakpoint. 75% averages to 80%. IOW, two 50% disabilities will be combined to 80% and that is what you'll be compensated for.

    Let's say you now get an additional award of 10%. The math goes like this; 50% + 50% = 75% + 10% of 25% remaining able body = 2.5%. Add that to 75% and you get 77.5% which averages to 80%. So, even though you got an additional award it wasn't sufficient to tip you into 90%.

    You get a bit extra for bi-lateral conditions and you combine them first. I haven't taken the time to really understand it because there's really no need to. The compensible % is always calculated on the computer, it never makes a mistake. There's usually no need for me to check its math skills un-less I'm just sitting around playing "what if". I usually have way too many other things in the skillet to do that.

    If it's still important, perhaps Stumpy will be along to help with the bi-lats.

    Here's another thought, If you're still having trouble biting off the drive in one fell swoop, you might also consider taking it in steps. In my case, it's 75 miles each way in commuter traffic. I try to schedule the appointment so I can take lunch about halfway thru. I found a neat little Indian Curry joint that I like and stop for a byte on the way. Hafta start out earlier but what the hey, it's cheap entertainment and the VA pays for most of the gas. Perhaps I'm too easily satisfied. Then, might be getting too old to let the little things bother me. Make a day of it and find some way to enjoy the trip.
  17. stumpy

    stumpy New Member

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    This the official explanation on how to compute a bilateral factor.

    When a partial disability results from disease or injury of both arms, or of both legs, or of paired skeletal muscles, the ratings for the disabilities of the right and left sides will be combined as usual, and 10 percent of this value will be added (i.e., not combined) before proceeding with further combinations, or converting to degree of disability. The bilateral factor will be applied to such bilateral disabilities before other combinations are carried out and the rating for such disabilities including the bilateral factor in this section will be treated as 1 disability for the purpose of arranging in order of severity and for all further combinations. For example, with disabilities evaluated at 60 percent, 20 percent, 10 percent and 10 percent (the two 10's representing bilateral disabilities), the order of severity would be 60, 21 and 20. The 60 and 21 combine to 68 percent and the 68 and 20 to 74 percent, converted to 70 percent as the final degree of disability.

    (a) The use of the terms “arms” and “legs” is not intended to distinguish between the arm, forearm and hand, or the thigh, leg, and foot, but relates to the upper extremities and lower extremities as a whole. Thus with a compensable disability of the right thigh, for example, amputation, and one of the left foot, for example, pes planus, the bilateral factor applies, and similarly whenever there are compensable disabilities affecting use of paired extremities regardless of location or specified type of impairment.

    (b) The correct procedure when applying the bilateral factor to disabilities affecting both upper extremities and both lower extremities is to combine the ratings of the disabilities affecting the 4 extremities in the order of their individual severity and apply the bilateral factor by adding, not combining, 10 percent of the combined value thus attained.

    (c) The bilateral factor is not applicable unless there is partial disability of compensable degree in each of 2 paired extremities, or paired skeletal muscles.
  18. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    Stumpy:

    If I have a 20% award for DMII, a 20% for right wrist carpal tunnel and a 10% left wrist carpal tunnel how is that combined?
  19. Jack

    Jack New Member

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    Disability

    TinCan Man/Stumpy,

    Good question. I has orginally gotten 20% for each shoulder. They bumped the left one up to 30%, so does that equal 25%? Also, I forget how much I got for my bilatteral hearing loss, I think 20% each ear. I also got compensated for tinnutis, bells whistles, ringing in both ears, would they consider those seperately or do they just add up the 20% for the ear housing group?

    Thanks

    Jack
    RLTW
  20. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    Jack:

    I think I have this all figured out. List all the awards as a percent and location (L/R) both bi-lat and otherwise and I'll do the math and explain. FWIW, I know for certain tinnitus doesn't get paid for bi-lat. Not sure about hearing loss.

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