Crdp

Discussion in 'Disability' started by Jack, Jan 30, 2005.

  1. Patrick F Kane

    Patrick F Kane New Member

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    First Time User, Any tips I am soon Retired

    Hi to all, I am hoping to get some valuable information from anyone. I recently completed my Seperation Physical for the Navy,the VA DOC did it and reviewed my claim. However I am kind of lost on what happens next. I understood that his exam and review was very important as to what and if I will get a disabilty rating. I leave the USN after about a 3 year LIMDU period for Chronic Hip pain and Lumbar Facet Diease. I completed 20 years of active duty and will receive an Hon discharge on 7-31-05 now starts my terminal leave period. Any suggestions or words of wisdom welcomed.
    Patrick
  2. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    Patrick:

    Welcome to Veterans Resources. This is a forum based board and you leave a message and sometime later someone will post a reply. You'll find your answer in the same thread where you left it. FWIW, if you have a new question, try to create a new thread.

    You will get all of your military retirement check and all of what ever the VA has told you, you are entitled to as a 100% disabled vet. There will be no offset.
  3. maxtor

    maxtor Member

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    Does anyone know what the senate done, if anything this year, about the veterans rated 100% by reason of Individual Unemployability. I know it had enough co-sponsers to forward. I know it was moved back to October 2009 last year but the bill come up again during this Congress and Senate. I havent been able to find anything pertaining to this year in reference to this.
  4. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    My understanding is it was attached to the NDAA FY07 and has been dropped. I'm told MOAA has an article on it but didn't see it myself. I did read in the Navy retired newsletter that it was dropped.
  5. bref

    bref New Member

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    help please

    10%,20% and 50% whats that come out to be i cant understand this excel spreadsheet.
  6. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    bref:

    What excel spreadsheet are you talking about? Are you trying to determine a combined rating? If so post the rating and ehat it is for like back, left knee, right leg. Left and right are important when calculating paired extremities.
  7. Vike17

    Vike17 Member

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    bref,

    50%, 20% and a 10% combined equals 64% rounded down to 60% according to the combined ratings table. This calculation is without any bi-laterals involved.

    Vike 17
  8. bref

    bref New Member

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    bi-laterals

    what is bi-laterals?????? please explain
  9. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    A bi-lateral award is granted when paired extremities/organs are affected. Say you were granted an award of 10% for your left hand and 20% for your right arm. They would get an additional award of 10% figured this way: 10% combined with 20% = 28% now multiply that 28% x an additional 10% = 2.8%. Add that 2.8% back into the 28% and get 30.8%. Round down to 30%. Those same conditions if they were both on the left hand and arm do not qualify for the additional 10%.

    In this case it doesn't change the outcome as the award would be 30% either way but with multiple awards or bigger awards it can make a big difference.

    FWIW, all bi-laterals are calculated before non bi-lats.
  10. maxtor

    maxtor Member

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    Here is something that was published on Vetspac today:

    After a two year effort, Senator Reed was successful in restoring the pay for about 40,000 CRDP rated over 60% with Unemployability. This increase retroactive to 2005 will cost about $630M.
  11. Black Joseph

    Black Joseph New Member

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    Hello all

    I've just found this place. I could use some help. I have recently retired from the Army. VA has sent me a rating letter with the following:

    PTSD 100%, Allergic Rhinitis 30% (and 6 others all rated at 0%)

    My retired pay is 1200 bucks my VA comp is 2781 (its been upped to 2843 I think)

    My injuries are a result of the Persian Gulf War and further troubled by another deployment OIF3.

    Now my question:

    Which other compensation do I fall under for my time in War. CRSC or CRDP ?
    Moreover if I apply does my retirement pay goes down or VA benefit goes down so that they can add in this additional benefit?

    I’ve been told that only 30 yr vets get separate checks!! and 20yr vets get a “combined check”. However I am finding that the second is not true; I am receiving both my retirement and VA Compensation right now. My letter is only a month old so not a lot of back-pay. I was back-paid for my VA benefit from the time of my Retirement to date.

    I hope someone can help me sort this out. The bottom line is this. If they will decrease my ret pay or VA Comp for this CRSC or CRDP I won’t file for it.

    I thank you in advance for all your help on this matter.

    Black Joseph
  12. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    You are entitled to either CRDP or CRSC but not both. CRSC is not taxed. CRDP is. CRSC is the better deal for you. File for it now. You will get a retirement check which will include CRSC and you will get a full VA compensation check. There is no offset of any kind for 100% disabled. Get it done. Do it now.
  13. Black Joseph

    Black Joseph New Member

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    Yes Sir!! I sure am that is great I thank you kindly for your help! GOD Bless you for your aid and for the hard work that is done here each day to help people. This place is nice so that ol' vets can get the straight skimmy and not the verbal "meandering" we get from those who hold public office. Thanks again and Merry Christmas.


    Black Joseph
  14. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    Black Joseph:

    One thing I assumed was that you are a Chapter 71 retiree (20 year or more service). You do have 20 years of active service, right?
  15. sooner1938

    sooner1938 New Member

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    All I have to say is - VA sure didn't study the same math as me.
  16. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    That's because it isn't generally considered math except in a limited way. It is based on the whole man principle commonly used in the insurance industry.

    The combined rating is not the simple addition of the various separate rated disabilities but instead utilizes the Combined Ratings Table found at 38 CFR § 4.25 which is based on the whole man principle, a chart in the Federal Regulations. This chart considers the efficiency of the individual as affected first by the most disabling condition, then by the less disabling condition or conditions in the order of severity. Thus, a person having a 60 percent disability is considered 40 percent efficient. Proceeding from this 40 percent efficiency, the effect of an additional 30 percent disability is to leave only 70 percent of the efficiency remaining after consideration of the first disability, or 28 percent efficiency altogether. The individual is thus 72 percent disabled. That ought to be clear as mud.

    Let me show you how to use the Table. Lets take a hypothetical veteran that has the following conditions:

    Diabetes Mellitus rated 20%
    Tinnitus rated 10%

    Always start with the largest award. In this case:
    20% Combine that with the next largest:
    10%

    Look at the table & find 20 in the leftmost column. Now look at the top row and find 10. Now find the intersection where the 20 row and 10 column meet. See 28. Someone with 20% combined with 10% is 28% disabled but the VA only pays at 10% increments so we round to nearest 10%. In this case, 28 rounds to 30% This veteran would have a combined rating of 30%

    Now lets say our veteran files a claim for Migraines and is awarded another 10% We already know 20 combined with 10 is 28 so now find 28 in the left most column and 10 in the top row. See where they intersect; right at 35. This veteran is 35% disabled, but 35 rounds up to 40%. IOW, the veteran has a combined rating of 40%

    Alright, let's say the veteran claims loss of hearing left ear and is awarded another 10%

    We know 20% combined with 10% combined with 10% comes to 35% so combining that with another 10% we look at the table and find 35% in the leftmost column and find the 10% in the top row. Where they intersect see 42. The veteran is 42% disabled but that 42% is rounded to a combined rating of 40%. He just got an additional 10% but his combined rating didn't move a bit. That's just the way it is.

    Now we need to consider bi-lateral awards. Bi-lateral awards get an additional 10% for conditions affecting paired extremities. Extremities are your arms and legs from the torso outward; upper arm, fore arm, hand and similar with the legs. Bi-lateral awards are always calculated before other awards.

    So lets say our veteran has just claimed and received awards for Peripheral Neuropathy upper arm right side at 20% and left hand 10%. The right arm and left hand are paired extremities. So to calculate we start with the largest award 20% and find it in the left most column. We then find 10% in the top row. Where they intersect see 28. Now find 10% of 28, that would be 2.8. Average that 2.8 to 3 and add it to the 28 you already have for a total of 31. Your bi-laterals alone = 31%. Now we start combining the non bi-laterals. Find 31 in left most column, then 20% (for diabetes) in top row. Where they intersect see 45. Now combine each of the 10% awards. 45% combined with the first 10% is 52%, which is then combined with the 2nd 10% is 57%. Combine the last 10% and that equals 61%. This rounds down to 60%. So our veteran now has a combined rating of 60%
  17. sooner1938

    sooner1938 New Member

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    Pardon me for saying this, TCM, but I don't (and never have) trusted any info this government gives out. And since you're a government employee who toes the party line, your explanation of government math (including the "whole-man concept" is more than a little suspect IMO.

    I don't trust their figures for the CPI, either. They're saying we had less than 3 percent inflation over the course of the last year. Whereas, almost everything we eat, wear or use is moved by truck, which uses fuel, the cost of which has increased tremendously. Of course, it's in their interest to downplay inflation, since all those government pensions, disability compensations and wages are affected by the CPI (supposedly).
  18. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    I don't have much confidence in government proclamations either, so I try to validate things on my own, where I can.

    Right, all government employees are part of some nefarious plot to screw the citizens. They pay us to try to mislead you. Even us low level peons are in on it. You do know what all those unmarked cars are doing on your street, right?

    No, "they" aren't saying that at all. "The Department of Labor calculates the change in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for urban wage earners and clerical workers from the third quarter average of the previous year to the third quarter average for the current year." It is quite different than what the annual rate of inflation.

    I don't know where you are getting this information from but it certainly isn't anyplace authoritative. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics compiles this information monthly. If it were even remotely wrong, there are plenty of govt watchdog agencies that would be pleased to holler foul. I don't see them doing that.


    What goods and services does the CPI cover?
    The CPI represents all goods and services purchased for consumption by the reference population (U or W) BLS has classified all expenditure items into more than 200 categories, arranged into eight major groups. Major groups and examples of categories in each are as follows:

    FOOD AND BEVERAGES (breakfast cereal, milk, coffee, chicken, wine, service meals and snacks)
    HOUSING (rent of primary residence, owners' equivalent rent, fuel oil, bedroom furniture)
    APPAREL (men's shirts and sweaters, women's dresses, jewelry)
    TRANSPORTATION (new vehicles, airline fares, gasoline, motor vehicle insurance)
    MEDICAL CARE (prescription drugs and medical supplies, physicians' services, eyeglasses and eye care, hospital services)
    RECREATION (televisions, pets and pet products, sports equipment, admissions);
    EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION (college tuition, postage, telephone services, computer
    software and accessories);
    OTHER GOODS AND SERVICES (tobacco and smoking products, haircuts and other personal
    services, funeral expenses). Also included within these major groups are various government-charged user fees, such as water and sewerage charges, auto registration fees, and vehicle tolls. In addition, the CPI includes taxes (such as sales and excise taxes) that are directly associated with the prices of specific goods and services. However, the CPI excludes taxes (such as income and Social Security taxes) not directly associated with the purchase of consumer goods and services.

    The CPI does not include investment items, such as stocks, bonds, real estate, and life insurance. (These items relate to savings and not to day-to-day consumption expenses.)
    For each of the more than 200 item categories, using scientific statistical procedures, the Bureau has chosen samples of several hundred specific items within selected business establishments frequented by consumers to represent the thousands of varieties available in the marketplace. For example, in a given supermarket, the Bureau may choose a plastic bag of golden delicious apples, U.S. extra fancy grade, weighing 4.4 pounds to represent the Apples category.

    Notice how "they" surreptitiously included transportation and fuel into the market basket while you weren't looking? Verrrryy sneaky of them. ...and before you try to blow smoke up my a$$ about that being private transportation/fuel you do understand the price of goods/food at the register includes all expenses the merchant might be responsible for; fuel, taxes, transportation, salaries, storage, display, yadda, yadda, yadda.
  19. GreenBeret

    GreenBeret New Member

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    Tin Can Man,

    I am just a new member here, but as a soon to be retired (as well age 60) veteran, my reply to those naysayers is just this!! As a 26 year veteran, I respect your right to state your opinion but there is a time and a place to do so. From review of this website and my observation of Tin Can Man's responses to many posts, I do not believe he is misleading anyone with information posted in these threads! If you feel the information is misleading, do your research and come back and post those findings. Ensure that your resources are reputable ones, and just not ones from blogs knocking the bureauacracy with misinformation and inuendos. It appears to me that this website is very informative and needed for those vets that are looking for answers.

    "No naysayers were injured during the preparation of this post" :D
  20. One-Zero

    One-Zero New Member

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    Hi "GreenBeret"...in case I may be reading something wrong on the forum as to you being Navy AGR, why did you choose that screen-name?

    regards,
    "1-0"

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