Diabetic Feet

Discussion in 'Disability' started by Navyvet30, Oct 19, 2007.

  1. Navyvet30

    Navyvet30 New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have painful Bunions , Fungal Nails and hammer toes ,none of which I had before Diabetes . I am a Vietnam Veteran exposed to Agent Orange . Are these problems considered for Disability ?
  2. Vike17

    Vike17 New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Are you asking if "bunions, fungal nails and hammer toes" are in any way medically related to DMII? If so, this would be a question for your physician. He/she must make the "nexus" or connection in order for VA to award secondary service-connection for these conditions. Having said that, I'm not a doctor by any means, but I seriuosly doubt there is a relationship between these and DMII.

    Vike 17
  3. CEDAR FALLS

    CEDAR FALLS Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Nail fungus is more common than you think in people with diabetes
    If you have diabetes, you are at higher risk for nail fungus, known
    medically as onychomycosis (on-ih-ko-my-KO-sis). In fact, people with diabetes are almost three times more likely to have nail fungus.


    Certain conditions associated with diabetes make it more likely for you to get nail fungus. You may have poor blood circulation in your legs and feet. Diabetes also can lead to nerve damage in the lower extremities. If you have a sore, you may not notice it until it has developed into a more serious ulcer.
  4. CEDAR FALLS

    CEDAR FALLS Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    VA CLAIMS SECONDARY TO DIABETES





    CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

    In this chronic disease, atherosclerosis narrows the coronary arteries, the arteries supplying blood to the heart muscle. As the coronary arteries narrow, the chest pain called angina may be triggered. And the risk of a heart attack (myocardial infarction), which occurs when a coronary artery is blocked completely, is increased. Coronary artery disease currently affects 11 million people in the United States.



    RIGHT UPPER EXTREMITY DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    LEFT UPPER EXTREMITY DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    RIGHT LOWER EXTREMITY DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    LEFT LOWER EXTREMITY DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    Examinations for diabetic neuropathy assess muscle strength, deep tendon reflexes, and sense of touch (temperature, pinprick or pressure sensation, vibratory sensation, position sense). Different functions are affected in different individuals, and symptoms may be out of proportion to the findings on examination. Diagnostic criteria are based on some combination of symptoms, focused neurologic examination, nerve conduction studies, and special quantitative sensory tests, but some tests are difficult and time consuming, and not all are ordinarily done.



    RIGHT FOOT ONYCHOMYCOSIS

    What are the skin complications? In addition to infections (for example, Candida, dermatophytes, and bacterial infections) and ulcers, there are several specific conditions that may affect diabetics. Onychomycosis due to Epidermophyton floccosum (Toenail Fungus)



    ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

    The examiner reviewed the medical records, examined the veteran, and provided the diagnosis of: Diabetes Mellitus. The examiner noted conditions as being secondary to the diabetes: Erectile dysfunction, hypertension, and neuropathy. The veteran reported to the examiner that attempts to alleviate the erectile dysfunction with medication had failed.

    ANALYSIS: Entitlement to special monthly compensation is warranted in this case because criteria regarding loss of use of a creative organ were met from This case has been reviewed pursuant to the class action Nehmer v. United States Veterans Administration, Civil Action No. C86-6 160 TEll (N.D.). An effective date of 04-30-0 1 has been assigned. This is the date on which the VA received the claim that resulted in the grant of compensation. The rule stated in 38 USC 5110(g) and 38 CFR 3.114 that an award based on liberalizing law may not be effective earlier than the effective date of the new law does not apply to Nehmer cases.



    RENAL DISEASE

    You need to have your doctor request regular 24 hour urine protein tests. They give you a plastic jug and you take it home, follow the directions and fill it up over 24 hours and then return it to the lab. They should also do a creatine test. The lab report will tell you the amount of microalbumin present. Creatin tests will also give an indication of the amount of renal damage and the efficiency of your kidneys. In order to be valid or acceptable to the VA there needs to be several 24 hour tests over a period.



    DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    impairment or loss of vision due to damage to the blood vessels of the retina.



    CATARACT

    clouding or opaqueness of the lens of the eye.



    GLAUCOMA

    Increased fluid pressure in the eye. Causes loss of visual fields due to optic nerve damage.
  5. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Yes, there's probably some study connecting your elbow to your eardrum but the problem is it is all meaningless and presenting info from the web is simply a waste of time. What does matter is that your doctor will opine more likely than not your whatever condition is related to something else and the reason for it will make medical sense to the decision maker. The bottom line here is to ask your doctor. Nothing else matters.
  6. CEDAR FALLS

    CEDAR FALLS Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Next time I will ask U Tincan before I post such rubbish
  7. Navyvet30

    Navyvet30 New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I am rated for upper and lower neuropathy for both legs and feet, however even after going to the podiatry clinic every quarter I still have problems walking because of the painful feet .
  8. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    That's your prerogative, it certainly isn't required nor did I imply it was. Understand, VRO is a forum and if you post information, someone else is likely to comment. You may or may not like them. Up to you.

    My comment is factual, the decision makers at the RO cannot make a medical diagnosis under any circumstances. Presenting them with a ton of literature about studies is a waste of time unless the claimant was the subject of the study.

    Anyone with information that may impact a diagnosis should present that information to his physician as his physician is licensed to make a diagnosis .AND. he can make a connection (nexus) between the condition as being related to military service.

    Two of the three requirements for service connection are a diagnosis and a nexus. Decision makers are not allowed to make either.
  9. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Then you should certainly tell your doctor about that and ask if he believes it is related to your service connected condition or military service. If you file a claim the VA will want an opinion stating "it is at least as likely as not" that it is. That phrase is very important as it is based in case law. The alternative is to depend on a C&P exam for the diagnosis and nexus. If it's a simple issue w/o controversy, that's OK. I'll take my own physician's opinion over a c&P examiner any day.
  10. ellislayne

    ellislayne New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The va hosp gave me an emg, wow did it hurt, till it got to above my ankles, then nothing, said i had neuropathy in both feet, that was 2 years ago, they denied my claim. My vso passed away now they have a new one who is going to quit, he shouldent even have been put in, I guess they know what they are doing. It took 2 years to get 20% on Diabetes. I figure by the time I am 87 I will be about 40%.
  11. CEDAR FALLS

    CEDAR FALLS Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    edited by Slapyo: obviously not a fact, rather an opinion. no personal attacks allowed on forums
  12. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Yeah, I understand that. Have had numerous EMG's since 1973. Have carpal tunnel syndrome in both hands with serious blockage in left. VAMC did one 7 years ago as part of my diabetes claim. When they got to my left hand I must have come 6 inches off the gurney. Decided no one would ever do an EMG on me again.

    That doesn't make any sense. If you have a diagnosis of neuropathy and service connected DMII, connecting the neuropathy should be a slam dunk. What does your doctor say about your neuropathy? Will he say your neuropathy is at least as likely as not a complication of your DMII?

    Check your decision papers, there's a section titled "Reasons" or "Reasons & Bases". In it you'll find why your claim was denied and what you have to show to prevail. Tell us what it says and maybe we can offer a suggestion on how to proceed.

    Are you a Vietnam vet claiming AO exposure as cause for DMII?

Share This Page