Does age make a difference?...

Discussion in 'Education Benefits' started by serenetie, Sep 10, 2009.

  1. serenetie

    serenetie New Member

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    I just applied for education benefits, but I am 35 years old. My father is 100% disabled (for about 3-4 years). I was told when I called that it is decided case by case, and that I had up to 10 years, and I was told I should go ahead and apply.. On the website it says until age 26 or 28. Anyone have any insight on what my chances are as to getting those benefits? If anyone has experience in my case? What would make the VA consider giving me those benefits since I am much older than the deadline?

    Any help/advice would be appreciated. :confused:
  2. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    I've heard some dependants getting benefits beyond the age stated but they weree generally going to school when dad became 100%. I don't know there's any key to it. I suspect you will be turned down.
  3. serenetie

    serenetie New Member

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    I found an answer...

    Can a veteran's child receive Survivors' & Dependents' Educational Assistance (also known as DEA or Chapter 35) payments after age 26?

    Question
    I receive benefits under the Survivors' & Dependents' Educational Assistance Program (also known as DEA or Chapter 35.) Under this program benefits are payable to sons and daughters from age 18 to 26. How can I receive benefits after the age of 26?

    Answer

    The ending date for DEA benefits for children is generally the 26th birthday. However, in some cases, you may be eligible to have your period of eligibility extended. Examples of some of these cases include:
    Veteran did not receive rating of “Permanently and Totally Disabled” until eligible child was between 18 and 26 years of age.
    Veteran died of DEA-qualifying cause while the eligible child was between ages 18 and 26.
    DEA-eligible child serves on active duty and is released (other than dishonorably) between ages 18 and 26.
    Veteran loses, and then regains, his or her permanent disability rating while the eligible child is between ages 18 and 26.
    VA determines that an eligible child had to suspend his or her program of education or training for reasons beyond the child's control.



    Other situations not listed here may qualify a DEA beneficiary to receive benefits past the age of 26, and eligibility decisions frequently must be made on a case-by-case basis.





    For additional help please click on the "Questions & Answers" tab on the left side of this web page or call1-888-GIBILL-1.



    For more information about DEA (Chapter 35) benefits, please click here.

    :p

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