Peripheral Neuropathy in Diabetics

Discussion in 'Diabetes' started by barfinkl, Jun 25, 2008.

  1. barfinkl

    barfinkl New Member

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    Is there compensation for subject nerve damage? Is it best to have a specialist treating you for your diabetes or is any MD OK when it comes to care...e.g., does the VA respect the medical opinions of a family practice physician as much as an endocrinologist, for example?

    Thanks much.
  2. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    You can be compensated for peripheral neuropathy. All things equal, they seldom are, the opinion of a specialist might ought weigh that of a GP, but it's more about what they say and how much concurance it has with medical science than it is with a raw opinion unsubstantiated.
  3. C-1/7MARINE

    C-1/7MARINE New Member

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    I receive compensation for PN, I am a diabetic also. I am 50% for right upper,40% left upper, and 30% for both lower extremities bilateral. I received the diagnosis from my primary care doc, but all I got was the diagnosis.which is the start. I then went to get tested in Neurology, through my primary care;part of that test checks electric response, the killer is the pin prick test, they got this test out of some concentration camp. The things vets have to do to prove we are suffering. Now I had proof of the severity of my "severe poly PN and limitations of work. Then I had to get a appointment with a neurologist for meds and documentation that I was unable to perform gainful employment. In the beginning I minimized how it effected me, tell your docs how you really feel! You have to fight for disabilities. It took 2 years to from start to award. Hope this helps.
  4. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    You really don't have to "fight" for anything but you really aren't going to walk in and say "You owe me, pay up" and then get a free go at the taxpayers wallet. That isn't the way it works.

    When Congress created the enabling legislation for compensation, they charged the Department of Veterans Affairs with overseeing and managing it. They also insisted the DVA require proof before compensating anyone.

    It is every veterans responsibility to provide that proof when making a claim.

    There are three things every successful claim has:

    1. Military Service
    2. A diagnosis of a compensable disease or condition
    3. A nexus or connection between 1 & 2

    It is the veterans responsibility to prove each of them.

    1 is satisfied by your DD-214
    2 is satisfied by either a physician or C&P examiners statement that you have the compensable condition.
    3 is satisfied by either a physician or C&P examiners statement that he has examined you and your Service Medical Records and your Service Personnel Record and finds "at least as likely as not" that your condition is a result of your service.

    He must support his claim by a rationale that is scientifically acceptable and supported by the evidence of record. IOW, he can't just make it up and he can't rely on your testimony exclusively to support his opinion.

    If you don't know how the system works, either learn or use the free services of of the various Veterans Services Organizations in filing your claim.

    The EMG/NCV test you had is a necessary component to a diagnosis of PN and is necessary whether you seek compensation or treatment and that applies to treatment by the VA or your own personal doctor. Fact of the matter is some medical procedures are downright unpleasant. That's just the way it is. No one is required to undergo any medical procedure against their will. Just say no thanks, then live with the consequences.
  5. boogalee

    boogalee New Member

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    Was just wondering if peripheral vascular disease could be linked to diabetes when applying for service connected conditions?
    Thanks
  6. stumpy

    stumpy New Member

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    Yes diabetes can cause PAD. Just Google PAD & Diabetes and you will find plenty of info.
  7. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    Entered in error and deleted by author.
  8. boogalee

    boogalee New Member

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    pad-reply

    Just to let everyone know, did get service connected comp. for PAD, 40%, took over a year, but did get it.
  9. TinCanMan

    TinCanMan Active Member

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    actually, a year isn't all that long for someone making an other than initial claim.
  10. Vietvet1

    Vietvet1 Member

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    I was told by the VA Personnel that after the initial claim is in place... it could be as long as 3 years for additional on the it. I always go by..." tell them it will be longer/more expensive/best under circumstance/ and when it comes in faster/less expensive/great outcome.... the receiver will be in a happy place. I am lucky to be patient with everyone but myself.

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