Video: The U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program Turns Five

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WASHINGTON, Sept. 23 /PRNewswire/ — Local community groups that want to help severely wounded soldiers have a new way they can get involved. The U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program (AW2), which turns five this year, launched a new program that provides information to local groups that want to help.

Background
AW2 started with a few hundred soldiers and now numbers more than 5,000 soldiers severely wounded since 9-11. At the foundation of the program is the AW2 Advocate, someone who provides personalized support to soldiers, veterans, and their families for as long as it takes. Severely wounded soldiers, veterans, and their families will need to adjust and re-adjust to the effects of their injuries for their entire lifetime.

How Organizations Help
Many community groups offer support to soldiers, veterans, and their families. Some help make handicapped adjustments to soldier’s homes, others provide recreational activities that help motivate wounded soldiers to continue to work at recovery and still others provide assistance and support to family members who often have to quit their jobs and move to care for the wounded soldier.

AW2 Community Support Network
The new AW2 Community Support Network will help organizations show their support. Through collaboration and communication, community groups can support soldiers, veterans, and families through advocacy, employment, and local services. For more information about the new AW2 Community Support Network, or general AW2 information, viewers can visit www.AW2.army.mil or call 1-800-237-1336 toll free.

About the Army Wounded Warrior Program
The Army Wounded Warrior Program assists and advocates for the most severely wounded, injured and ill soldiers, veterans, and their families by providing individualized support for as long as it takes, wherever they are located, regardless of their military status.

AW2 assists the unique population of severely wounded, injured, and ill soldiers since 9/11 along with their families. Typical injuries include post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, hearing loss, paralysis, burns, blindness and loss of limb.

SOURCE U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program

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